Beyond Materialism

Beyond Materialism

by Kingsley Dennis

The human being has to become what he thinks himself to be.
Rudolf Steiner

We are having to adapt ourselves to a new loss – the demise of an old reality. Yet we should not mourn it but rather greet the new. There is no need to suffer in this readaptation; nor does it need to be overwhelming. Yet, there will be those needing recovery time. In modern terms, the world is going through an overhaul. When viewed through the metaphysical lens, it is a transfiguration. The human nervous system will be going through a vibrational recalibration; the mind will be rewiring its neuronal pathways; and a new orientation will be arising. Lucidity will come to replace the fog, eventually.

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